On-Street Protected Bike Lanes

What We’ve Heard

Community Focus Groups shared the following input:

  • On-street bike lane improvements to separate cyclists
    from moving traffic are a priority.

The technical analysis showed that:

  • Approximately 25 percent of the corridor is part of the Countywide High Injury Network for bicyclists. The High-Injury Network includes roadway segments with the most fatal and severe injury crashes.
  • Currently, approximately 25% of trips in the study area are short enough to be made by bike (2 miles or less).
  • Future development and growth will create more opportunities for people to bike for daily needs

Long-Term Vision – 2040

The long-term vision is for on-street protected bike lanes from San Leandro to Fremont. This would involve physical separation between bike lanes and moving traffic, with the type of separation (on-street parking, landscaping, or flex posts) will be determined based on the location. This will provide safer, more comfortable travel for people riding bikes.

On-street bike long term vision map

What’s Happening Soon?

  • Alameda County, Hayward, and Fremont have projects underway that will add protected bike lanes to the corridor.
  • Additional near-term improvements provide new or improvement bike lanes in areas that are part of the Countywide High Injury Network.

Map depicting various on-street bike improvement next steps

Types of Bike Lanes

There are several classes of bike lanes (described briefly below), and the current proposals include Class II Buffered and Class IV Protected Bike Lanes. Class I trails are proposed in Fremont.

Class II Buffered Bike Lanes are on the street with a painted buffer zone between the bike lane and traffic.

Example of Class II Buffered Bike Lanes

Class IV Protected Bike Lanes are on the street but are physically separated from traffic by parked cars, posts, or other vertical barriers. Class IV bike lanes require more space within the right of way than Class II or Class II buffered lanes.

Example of Class IV Protected Bike Lanes

Other Bike Lanes

Class I Trails are off the street and separated from other traffic. The East Bay Greenway will include this type of facility.

Class II Standard Bike Lanes are on the street with a painted stripe between the bike lane and traffic. This type of facility is not proposed for the Corridor.

Class III Signed Bike Routes are Class I Trails are off the street designed so that bicyclists share the lane with other traffic. They include markings on the pavement (sharrows) and signage indicating motorists should share the lane. This type of facility is not proposed for the Corridor.

NOTE: Class II standard bike lanes and Class III bike routes are shown here to present the full set of bike facilities in the industry, but these are not proposed in this project.

Let Us Know Your Thoughts

  • After submitting your response, you can read about other types of improvements and share additional thoughts.